Type and Conflict

  Type and Conflict Image

Conflict describes many different types of interactions. These challenges occur every day in our personal and professional lives. Since you can’t escape them, learning how to handle conflict is critical.

Recent research by Damian Killen and Danica Murphy have revealed that the last two preferences (Thinking or Feeling; Judging or Perceiving) of the Myers-Briggs Psychological Type Theory have significant bearing on people’s focus and response to conflict.

Conflict and Type

  Conflict and Type Image

When conflicts become reoccurring or frequent, type is a useful tool for building a clearer communication picture.

Not surprising when people are in conflict they most naturally fall back on their strongest preferences.

The table below provides information on how you may self-reflect on your responses to conflict or to identify the preferences of others are using in a conflict.

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Mutual Use of Opposite Type PreferencesOpposite Type Preferences Image

Understanding people with different preferences can be beneficial in every day work situations. It can help teams clarify problems, make decisions, create more positive meetings and unify communication.

According to the work of Carl Jung, when your mind is active, you are involved in one of two mental processes:

  • Taking in information (Sensing or Intuition)
  • Organizing that information and coming to conclusions (Thinking or Feeling)

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Type and Sacred Hoops

Basketball Hoop Image

Most of us know about the success of Phil Jackson and his unique coaching style that led to six NBA championships.

But have you ever thought about it in regard to the type preferences of the MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator)?

In type theory, there are two ways of taking in information – Sensing and Intuition. People tend to trust one of these preferences over the other.

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Communicating Deliberately

Communicating Deliberately Image

Open communication with others fosters trust, enhances information flow, builds relationships and increases respect. Effective leaders know the value of two-way communication.

Our relationships at work can make or break our ability to implement our vision and goals. Changing situations demand increasingly sophisticated interpersonal skills.

Embracing the power of type preferences can have a tremendous impact on how we reach others. Use the following tips to communicate deliberately in your next conversation with someone of the opposite preference.

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Type as We Age

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a fascinating personality profile based on the work of Carl Jung. Jung suggested that psychological type is a compass for the life long process of individualization. Much research has been done using the MBTI tool– including how type is affected during our life long process of growth and development. Discover the richness of the dynamics of type by thinking of how your type has evolved over the years.

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Using Type to Navigate Change

Change Image

Organizations are constantly going through change to become successful, stay on top of the competition or to just merely survive. Fundamentally, change may affect how we work, who we work for, what goals we are trying to achieve, and in what direction we are heading. At the extremes, some employees find change stimulating and exciting and other employees want to stay in the past.

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